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Overview

1906 - 1914

As they moved into the twentieth century, the shipping line Norddeutsche Lloyd of Bremen were in financial difficulties.  In an effort to diversify, they founded subsidiary Norddeutsche Armaturenfabrik AG in 1902 to make electric motors.



Four years later, an agreement was made with Compagnie Parisienne des Voitures Electriques, makers of Krieger electric vehicles, to build their designs under licence as Lloyds. The new company would be known as Norddeutsche Automobil und Motoren AG situated in Bremen.

But by the time that the first Lloyd Elektro electric cars were ready in 1907, the electric era was virtually over and Compagnie Parisienne des Voitures Electriques themselves went out of business within the next two years.

It was obvious to Lloyd that a petrol engined car was desperately required and Dr Heinrich Weigand, Norddeutsche Lloyds general manager, approached industrial designer Joseph Vollmer, the founder of Deutsche Automobil Konstruktion GmbH in 1907.  Vollmer agreed to work for Lloyd as a consultant and between the date of his appointment until 1914, he designed cars of 3.7 litres, 2.3 litres, 2.5 litres and 5.5 litres. But none of them were successful and Lloyd continued to lose money during that period.

In May 1914, Lloyd were taken over by Hansa Automobil-Gesellschaft mbH of Verel.  The company was renamed Hansa-Lloyd Werke AG and the Lloyd name on its own was discontinued.


1950-1963

Lloyd reappeared in 1950 as a product of the Borgward company. Borgward had taken over Hansa-Lloyd between 1929 and 1931, discontinuing that name for private cars in 1929.

The Hansa name was retained for passenger cars and Lloyd was used for lorries and commercial vehicles.

But a new company was formed in 1950, named Lloyd Motoren-Werke GmbH. It was part of Carl F. W. Borgward GmbH and both companies were situated in Bremen.

Their first car, created during the time of the 'bubble car' boom, had a small wooden framed, leatherette covered body that gave rise to the nickname 'Hansaplastwagen' (the sticking plaster car). It was powered by a 293cc two cylinder engine. In 1954, a steel body was introduced and the car was very successful, selling over 45,000 in 1955.

In 1957, the engine was replaced by a 596cc unit and the car became known as the Alexander. A four cylinder 897cc car named the Arabella was introduced the same year.

The Arabella deluxe was sold as a Borgward in 1960/1961.

Lloyd sold more than 40,000 cars in 1959 and were very successful, until the Borgward company collapsed and filed for bankruptcy in 1961.

A few Arabella's were sold as late as 1963, but they were built from remaining stock parts.

Both Lloyd and Borgward were able to pay all of their creditors in full after the bankruptcy, but it was the and of car production for both of them.

Source: Reg J. Prosser



 

Models produced by Lloyd (D)

650

650

1946-1951

Alexander

Alexander

1957-1961

Arabella

Arabella

1959-1963

Frua

Frua

1958-1959

LP 300

LP 300

1950-1951

LP 400

LP 400

1953-1957

LP 600

LP 600

1955-1959

LT 500

LT 500

1952-1955

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