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Overview

One of Britains earliest car producers, Wolseley, actually started off in Engineering, producing sheep-shearing equipment! For many years it was run by none other than Herbert Austin who went on to form his own highly successful motor business. By 1901 Wolseley had become part of Vickers, however it was sold again in 1927 to Austin rival, William Morris.

Early Wolseley cars had been elegant luxury models competing with Napier, Rolls-Royce and Daimler. Following the Morris take-over the models from Wolseley were based on modified Morris chassis, although they soon gained a loyal following from Britains middle classes and the Police.

By the mid-1950's Wolseley found itself as part of the BMC organisation, its name gracing the upper models of the BMC range. Like MG and Riley the Wolseley brand identity was remained intact, wood and leather interiors and the famous Wolseley "illuminated grille badge". The Wolseley name continued under the control of British Leyland until 1975 when it was finally laid to rest.

Source: Motorbase

1896-1975

For the ten years from 1896 while Wolseley was experimenting with, and then producing motorcars, there was one man who drove the whole enterprise forward: Herbert Austin. In 1899 he devised a four-wheeled voiturette with a front-mounted horizontal single-cylinder engine and the design was put into production at the Adderley Park factory in Birmingham from 1901. Two and four-cylinder cars, also with horizontal engines, were soon added to the range. With their tubular radiators wrapped around the bonnet Wolseleys were immediately recognisable, and the cars rapidly earned a reputation for reliability and durability.

From 1902 until 1905 Austin made special Wolseley racing cars that because of their low build and sleek lines were called 'Beetles'. They competed in major continental races but suffered many misfortunes and disappointing results.

When Austin left Wolseley in the latter part of 1905 a range of vertical-engined cars was introduced and by 1913 Wolseley was Britain's largest indigenous motorcar manufacturer, producing around 3000 vehicles a year.

Source: Society of Automotive Historians in Britain

Models produced by Wolseley

10

1945-1948

1100

1100

1965-1968

12/48 Series III

12/48 Series III

1937-1948

1300

1300

1967-1973

14/60

1935-1938

14/60 Series III

14/60 Series III

1938-1948

15/50

15/50

1956-1958

15/60

15/60

1958-1961

1500

1500

1957-1965

16/45, Viper

16/45, Viper

1927-1932

16/60

16/60

1961-1971

18/85

18/85

1967-1972

18/85 Series III

18/85 Series III

1938-1948

21/60

1930-1932

21/60

21/60

1933-1935

2200 Six

2200 Six

1972-1975

25 Drophead Coupe

25 Drophead Coupe

1938-1939

25 Series III

25 Series III

1938-1948

4/44

4/44

1952-1956

4/50

4/50

1948-1953

6/110 Series I

6/110 Series I

1961-1964

6/110 Series II

6/110 Series II

1964-1968

6/80

6/80

1948-1954

6/90 Series I

6/90 Series I

1954-1956

6/90 Series II

6/90 Series II

1956-1957

6/90 Series III

6/90 Series III

1958-1959

6/99

6/99

1959-1961

8

1946-1948

Eight

1946-1948

Eighteen

1935-1935

Fourteen

1935-1935

Fourteen NF

Fourteen NF

1935-1936

Hornet

Hornet

1930-1932

Hornet

1932-1935

Hornet

Hornet

1935-1936

Hornet I

Hornet I

1961-1963

Hornet III

Hornet III

1966-1969

Hornet Series II

Hornet Series II

1963-1966

Hornet Special 12

Hornet Special 12

1932-1934

Hornet Special 14

Hornet Special 14

1935-1935

Nine

Nine

1934-1935

Oxford Hire Car

1950-1955

Series II 10/40

1936-1937

Series II 12/48

Series II 12/48

1936-1937

Series III 12/48

Series III 12/48

1937-1939

Six

Six

1972-1975

six

1975-0

Six 18/22

Six 18/22

1975-1975

Sixteen

1933-1935

Ten

1939-1939

Ten

Ten

1939-1948

Wasp

Wasp

1935-1936

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